10 Signs You’re Secretly An Introvert

  • Some estimates indicate introverts account for 1 in 3 people. Others place it much higher, as high as 3 out of 4 people.
  • There are 4 types of introverts: Social, Thinking, Anxious, and Restrained
  • Introverts tend to index higher for creativity, on average, than extroverts

We frequently think of introverts as being outwardly shy, or actively disengaged. However, this is not always the case. You would be surprised at how often people we consider emblematic of extroversion are actually secret introverts.

Being introverted is wonderful – it’s a personality type that should be celebrated for its own unique strengths. However, social pressures often place more value on outgoing behavior. Frequently, introverts make behavioral adjustments in order to comply with these social pressures. Since this type of introversion presents in less obvious ways, this is what we call secret introversion.

Introverts account for anywhere from 50% – 74% of the population. You may secretly be an introvert, and not even realize it.

Once you know the signs, you may recognize that you’re secretly more introverted than you previously thought! Here are 10 signs that may indicate you’re secretly an introvert:

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1. You’re An Articulate Speaker, But Prefer To Communicate Through Writing

We typically associate introverts as having difficulty speaking in certain settings, or being too shy to express themselves. However, this is not always the case. Secret introverts may be very articulate speakers, but it isn’t their preferred medium of communication. They may find themselves drained after smiling and interfacing in person, and for this reason, they prefer to communicate through an email or messaging service.

If you find that, despite being an excellent orator, you’re drained after doing so, you may secretly be an introvert. Nobody would ever know it, though, because you’re so skilled at speaking.

2. Meeting People At Parties Isn’t Stimulating To You

You don’t mind going to parties, but fraternizing and meeting new people isn’t your main goal. You don’t mind meeting new people, but primarily you’re there to spend time and connect with people that you already know. Being tethered to a group of familiar faces with whom you share a deep connection is critical to your enjoyment of the party. If you meet a new and interesting person, great – but if not, that’s okay, as well. In fact, you hide your introversion so well that nobody would ever suspect you’re secretly disinterested in mingling.¬†(Continues on Page 2)

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3. Observing Peoples’ Behavior Is Interesting To You

On the subject of parties, since your primary goal isn’t to meet new people, that leaves plenty of time open on your party schedule to observe the behavior of others. You may take a great interest in maintaining a safe distance on the sidelines and simply watching what people do. Human behavior is interesting to you.

This doesn’t just occur at parties, either. Whether it’s at a coffee shop, or just sitting on a park bench, there’s something profoundly intriguing to you about people watching.

4. Downtime Doesn’t Feel Like Wasted Time

While some people may feel that they’re wasting away in their downtime, this is where you really shine. You may even stay up late because you know that once you go to sleep, it’s back to the office. You revel in your time to kick back with a cup of coffee, and grind through a stack of magazines or make progress on a project you pick up during your time off. If you feel your energy and motivations levels pick up during your down time, you may secretly be an introvert.

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5. You Can’t Stand Small Talk

Many of the aforementioned behaviors overlap with this secret introvert trait. Small talk, whether it occurs at parties or work, feels cumbersome to you. You don’t find it difficult – in fact, you are really good at small talk. For this reason, you’re able to conceal your secret contempt for such interactions. After a few interactions like this, despite being so adept at convincing your audience you are a skilled small talker, you are drained and ready to curl up with a book.

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You Have A Prominent and Persistent Inner Monologue

Talking to other people isn’t your favorite activity, and yet your internal monologue never seems to stop. Ironic, isn’t it? You often find yourself contemplating everything from the existential to the trivial. Whether it’s a question about the meaning of life or simply trying to understand the behavior of the people around you, your brain is its own favorite audience to consult with and confide in.

Networking Makes You Feel Inauthentic

While going to networking events is a completely organic and enjoyable activity to some, it makes you feel slightly uncomfortable and awkward. You may even be skilled at attending networking opportunities, but no matter how much success and praise you receive for your networking skills, you can’t shake the idea that you are not presenting your authentic self. Similar to your feelings towards parties, you don’t mind going to networking events, but you would prefer to spend your time socializing in more organic settings, accompanied by people with whom you share established relationships.

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Talking On The Phone Can Be Draining

When you receive an incoming call, there’s a slight sense of dread attached to accepting it. You may contemplate it for a second, even if it’s someone you love to talk to. You may ask yourself, “Why can’t this person just message me!?” At the same time, you don’t mind talking to the person, so you pick up and sound happy to the person on the other end of the phone. You enjoy the conversation, but afterword, you’re drained. If you could have it your way, you would be finished socializing for the remainder of the day. From here on out, it’s either email, a messaging service, or nothing at all. You may secretly be an introvert.

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Socialization Is Followed By A Profound Need For Alone Time

Speaking on the phone may subsequently call for a few hours of downtime. Meeting up in person may require an entire weekend or more. At the end of the week, after 40-50 hours in an office surrounded by your coworkers, all you want to do is turn off your phone, shut your laptop, and binge on Netflix in solitude. When Sunday night comes, you get the “Sunday scaries” at the prospect of having to emerge from your solitude. On Monday, you dread being askedno less than 30 times how your weekend was. You may be good at convincingly playing the socialization game, but secretly, it drains your energy.

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Focusing On A Task In Solitude For Long Periods Of Time Comes Naturally To You

You don’t get lonely when working on a project in solitude. Whether it’s work-related, reading a book, or just catching up on chores around the house, you cherish your opportunities to get things accomplished without the distractions endemic to the presence of other people. In fact, you find that you work¬†better when you are alone, and you rarely feel lonely.

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You’ve Been Described As “Too Intense”

You despise small talk, but love a good conversation. What’s the difference? Well, while small talk might stay at a very light level (hence, why it’s called small talk), you may be waiting with bated breath to dive into questions of love and life, existentialism and philosophy. You love a good, profound conversation. You are thrilled when you engage with someone who feels the same way as you, but are disappointed when you wear your heart on your sleeve and can sense things get a little awkward. You may have even been explicitly told that you’re a little too intense. You may secretly be an introvert.

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